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A TIME-SERIES ANALYSIS: IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON INFLUENZA IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ( A TIME-SERIES ANALYSIS: IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON INFLUENZA IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA )

Author : -Gulhan BIZEL-; Amey G JAUNJARE; Yashaswini M PRASAD; Virendra RAJPUT - Vijay Kumar Reddy VODDİ

Abstract

Respiratory viruses are among the leading causes of disease and death among people. Co-circulation of Influenza and SARS-CoV-2 can lead to diagnostic and management difficulties given the similarities in the clinical picture. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus causing COVID-19, has caused a disastrous pandemic with over 100 million cases and 2 million deaths globally so far. Viral infections such as Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus are among the prominent causes of death and diseases among people. COVID-19 and flu share some similar symptoms. The symptoms of flu tend to occur faster and can have more significant variations. But COVID-19 is more likely to lead to severe illness or death. Viral infections cause both COVID-19 and the flu. But COVID-19 is due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and flu is from Influenza A and B viruses. There is a lot that remains unknown about COVID-19. However, it is crucial to follow the guidance and recommendations provided by the CDC and local health authorities. A respiratory tract infection is an infection of the lungs, airways, sinuses, or throat. While respiratory infections occur year-round, there is a significant increase in these infections during the fall and winter months (cold and flu season). People tend to spend more time inside. During cold and flu season, it helps to know the common symptoms and how to avoid spreading illness to those around you. With the increasing cases of COVID-19 during the still ongoing pandemic, understanding the difference between common respiratory infections and your treatment options is even more critical. This research aims prediction of the Influenza trend in the U.S. before COVID-19 existed and relate if there are any changes in the prediction due to the impact of COVID-19.

Keywords: COVID-19, Influenza trend, Flu trends, Pandemic, Prediction, Forecasting, Time Series Analysis, Database, CDC, WHO


Respiratory viruses are among the leading causes of disease and death among people. Co-circulation of Influenza and SARS-CoV-2 can lead to diagnostic and management difficulties given the similarities in the clinical picture. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus causing COVID-19, has caused a disastrous pandemic with over 100 million cases and 2 million deaths globally so far. Viral infections such as Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus are among the prominent causes of death and diseases among people. COVID-19 and flu share some similar symptoms. The symptoms of flu tend to occur faster and can have more significant variations. But COVID-19 is more likely to lead to severe illness or death. Viral infections cause both COVID-19 and the flu. But COVID-19 is due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and flu is from Influenza A and B viruses. There is a lot that remains unknown about COVID-19. However, it is crucial to follow the guidance and recommendations provided by the CDC and local health authorities. A respiratory tract infection is an infection of the lungs, airways, sinuses, or throat. While respiratory infections occur year-round, there is a significant increase in these infections during the fall and winter months (cold and flu season). People tend to spend more time inside. During cold and flu season, it helps to know the common symptoms and how to avoid spreading illness to those around you. With the increasing cases of COVID-19 during the still ongoing pandemic, understanding the difference between common respiratory infections and your treatment options is even more critical. This research aims prediction of the Influenza trend in the U.S. before COVID-19 existed and relate if there are any changes in the prediction due to the impact of COVID-19.

Keywords: COVID-19, Influenza trend, Flu trends, Pandemic, Prediction, Forecasting, Time Series Analysis, Database, CDC, WHO